drone pilot industryAgweekTV Full Show: Drought assistance, pork line speeds, Corn and Soybean Tour, Minnesota farm family

September 4, 2021by helo-10
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COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV

LAWMAKERS CONTINUE TO WORK ON DROUGHT ASSISTANCE FOR THE REGION’S PRODUCERS.

Michelle: We’ll find out how the court ruling against NSIS line speeds is impacting the pork industry.

THE AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR MAKES STOPS IN NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA.

AND WE’LL MEET THE MINNESOTA FARM FAMILY OF THE YEAR.

WELCOME TO AGWEEK TV, I’M MICHELLE ROOK.

WEATHER WAS BACK IN THE HEADLINES THIS WEEK, WITH UNCERTAINTY ABOUT EXPORTS WITH PORT DAMAGE TIED TO HURRICANE IDA.

IT COULD TAKE A FEW WEEKS TO RESUME EXPORT LOADINGS IN THE GULF AND WHILE MOST GRAIN IN OUR REGION MOVES TO THE PNW, THIS WILL IMPACT THE ABILITY TO GET TRAINS TO MOVE GRAIN AT HARVEST, WHICH CAN PRESSURE PRICES.

MEANWHILE, OUR WEATHER HAS IMPROVED WITH RECENT RAIN IN THE REGION, BUT THE U.S. DROUGHT MONITOR SHOWS LITTLE IMPROVEMENT. AND GOVERNORS IN THE AFFECTED STATES CONTINUE TO PUSH FOR ASSISTANCE.

SOUTH DAKOTA GOVERNOR KRISTI NOEM SAYS ITS ONE OF THE DRIEST YEARS IN THE STATE IN THE LAST CENTURY AND 62 OF THE 66 COUNTIES HAVE BEEN DECLARED DISASTER AREAS TO ALLOW FEDERAL ASSISTANCE. BUT SHE’S WORKING WITH NEIGHBORING GOVERNORS ON ADDITIONAL DROUGHT AID

Gov. Kristi Noem We have some grant programs through economic development and the disaster relief program but a lot of the relief for producers that are actively engaged comes at the federal level and always has.

NOEM SAYS THEY’RE ALSO PUSHING USDA TO MAKE D3 COUNTIES ELIGIBLE FOR HAYING AND GRAZING ON CRP ACRES.

THE NORTH DAKOTA EMERGENCY COMMISSION HAS APPROVED 2.5 MILLION DOLLARS IN FUNDING TO REACTIVATE THE EMERGENCY FEED TRANSPORTATION ASSISTANCE PROGRAM. GOVERNOR DOUG BURGUM SAYS THIS LOWERS THE COST FOR LIVESTOCK PRODUCERS TO SECURE HAY DURING THE DROUGHT. THE DEPARTMENT OF AG IS BORROWING THE MONEY FROM THE BANK OF NORTH DAKOTA FOR THE PROGRAM.

THE NORTH DAKOTA STOCKMEN’S ASSOCIATION AND THE STUTSMAN COUNTY SHERIFF ARE TRYING TO FIND OUT HOW DOZENS OF COWS DIED.

PREGNANT COWS, OWNED BY BRIAN AMUNDSON OF JAMESTOWN, WERE FOUND DEAD ON JULY 29TH, IN A PASTURE LEASED FOR GRAZING ON THE ARROW WOOD NATIONAL WILDLIFE REFUGE. OF THE 80 SURVIVING COWS, AT LEAST 15 HAVE ABORTED THEIR CALVES.

A 40 THOUSAND DOLLAR REWARD IS BEING OFFERED FOR INFORMATION LEADING TO AN ARREST.

INVESTIGATORS SAY THE DEATHS DON’T APPEAR TO BE FROM NATURAL CAUSES. AMUNDSON SAYS SOME OF HIS EMPLOYEES DISCOVERED THE CATTLE.

Brian Amundson: I IMMEDIATELY WENT TO THE PASTURE AND THEN THE WHOLE PROCESS KIND OF STARTED WITH CALLING THE STATE VETERINARIAN AND THE CORRECT OFFICIALS THAT NEEDED TO BE THERE TO HELP US FIGURE OUT THE WHAT AND THE WHYS IMMEDIATELY, THAT THERE WASN’T A THREAT TO THE OTHER LIVESTOCK, OURSELVES OR ANYBODY ELSE WITHIN THE SURROUNDING AREA.

IF YOU HAVE ANY INFORMATION, CALL THE STUTSMAN COUNTY SHERIFF’S TIP LINE AT THE NUMBER ON YOUR SCREEN, OR CONTACT THE STOCKMEN’S ASSOCIATION.

PORK PRODUCERS ARE FEELING THE STING OF AN APRIL 9 MINNESOTA FEDERAL COURT RULING AGAINST THE NEW SWINE INSPECTION SYSTEM or NSIS LINE SPEEDS. LABOR UNIONS CHALLENGED THE FASTER SLAUGHTER PACE, ARGUING IT UNDERMINES WORKER SAFETY. BUT AN IOWA STATE UNIVERSITY STUDY INDICATES THE SLOWER LINES WILL RESULT IN AN $80 MILLION LOSS TO PRODUCERS. IT’S OUR AGWEEK COVER STORY.

Wholestone Farms in Fremont, Nebraska was one of the original six plants in USDA’s pilot, testing the faster line speeds for nearly 20 years. CEO Scott Webb says they were running at 11,000 head per day until the court ruling went into effect July 1.

Webb: And so now our daily capacity is more like 9,200 head a day. So that’s had a pretty big impact on us.

He says they line up pigs from their farmer owners nearly two years in advance, so they’re having to compensate for the 12-percent drop in capacity.

Webb: We will have the capacity to harvest all their pigs but it will force us to run on certain additional Saturdays in order to accomplish that because there is lower line speed.

For the last two months they’ve been working with USDA on a waiver and are also looking at options such as adding a second evisceration line. But for now less processing capacity at these six plants is having a negative market impact.

Preisler: What it does it has the equivalent of shutting a plant down in the U.S. which is problematic as we look at,you know, trying to match up available hog supply and also plant capacity.

He says they’ve managed this summer because seasonally there aren’t as many hogs, but in the fall those numbers pick up.

Preisler: And so that’s why it’s certainly important to try and have USDA and the federal government kind of solve this issue. Whether it’s through an expedited rule making or an administrative action.

And Webb says they have 20 years of data to back up food and worker safety with the faster lines.

Webb: If you put it into a chart, line speeds over that 20 year period as they steadily climb up and you put on the same chart injury rate based on OSHA rate has steadily gone down.

Currently they’re not looking at legal action and hope that sound science will win out.

YOU CAN READ MORE IN THE NEXT AGWEEK MAGAZINE, OR AT AGWEEK.COM.

COMING UP ON AGWEEK TV, OUR CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR CONTINUES, WITH A CHECK ON CROPS IN NORTH DAKOTA AND MINNESOTA.

AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR PRESENTED BY

A LITTLE RAIN HAS MADE A BIG DIFFERENCE FOR DROUGHT STRICKEN CROPS AROUND THE REGION.

WE CONTINUE OUR AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR, BEGINNING WITH A CHECK IN MINNESOTA.

MIKKEL PATES IN THE GRANITE FALLS, MINNESOTA AREA WITH THE 2021 CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR FOR AGWEEK. WE’RE TALKING TO DORIAN GATCHEL, THE OWNER OF MINNESOTA AGRICULTURAL SERVICES. WHAT’S THE MESSAGE FROM THE 2021 CROP SO FAR?

orian Gatchell: WELL, DON’T GIVE UP ON IT YET. WE DO SEE A LOT OF VARIATION. SOME AREAS, SOME SOIL TYPES, SOME TOPOGRAPHIES ARE DEFINITELY DOING WORSE THAN OTHER AREAS. I’M AN ADVOCATE OF STRIP TILL. I REALLY DO LIKE THAT TECHNIQUE OR THAT PRACTICE. THERE IS NO ONE PRACTICE THAT IS GOOD FOR EVERYTHING, BUT IN GENERAL, I THINK THAT HAS A REALLY GOOD FIT. AS I WAS MENTIONING EARLIER, THAT WIND STORM THAT WE HAD THE WEEK PRIOR TO IN IOWA GOT REALLY HIT WITH THAT WIND STORM. RIGHT IN THROUGH HERE, THE STRIP TILL FIELDS STOOD. YOU KNOW, WHEN I WENT OUT WITH THE DRONE OR WAS ABLE TO,YOU KNOW, GET A HILLSIDE TO BE ABLE TO SEE OVER THE FIELDS, I COULD SEE WHERE WHEEL TRACKS WERE STANDING AND EVERYTHING ELSE WAS DOWN. OR THERE WAS SOME OTHER INFLUENCE AS TO WHY THE PATTERN AND THE DAMAGE.

BUT WHEN I COME OUT TO THESE FIELDS THAT WERE STRIP TILLED, IT LOOKED LIKE THEY HADN’T EVEN EXPERIENCED THE WIND, THEY WERE ABLE TO WITHHOLD. AND REALLY IT COMES DOWN TO IT WAS THE SOIL THAT FAILED IN THESE OTHER CONDITIONS VERSUS THE ACTUAL CROP, AND I’M HOPING THAT SAME CONDITION, THAT SAME SOIL CONDITION, IS GOING TO LET THE RESILIENCE IN THESE DRY YEARS, SHOW THROUGH.

Jenny Schlecht: I’M NORTH OF MANDAN, NORTH DAKOTA WITH SPENCE KOENIG OF DIRECT AG SUPPLY. WE’RE GOING TO TAKE A LOOK AT THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN CORN THAT’S BEEN IRRIGATED IN WESTERN NORTH DAKOTA, AND CORN THAT HAS NOT. SO SPENCE, WHAT ARE WE SEEING HERE IN THIS FIELD?

Spence Koenig: SO BASICALLY WHERE THE WATER DIDN’T HIT FROM THE PIVOT WE HAVE NOTHING. IT’S, THERE’S SOME STALKS AND A COUPLE LITTLE TINY EARS. BUT WE GO IN JUST A LITTLE BIT WAYS HERE AND THAT’S WHERE THE END GUN HITS. NIGHT AND DAY DIFFERENCE WHERE THE WATER HITS.

WE’VE HEARD A LOT ABOUT THE POTENTIAL FOR CORN JUST NOT MAKING ENOUGH TO EVEN BOTHER COMBINING IT. WHAT ARE WE SEEING AS FAR AS ARE PEOPLE CHOPPING? ARE PEOPLE BALING? WHAT ARE YOU SEEING IN YOUR CUSTOMERS?

THERE’S A LOT OF BOTH GOING ON. BUT MOST OF IT’S GETTING SILAGED, DUE TO THE FACT THAT THE NITRATES ARE SO HIGH ON IT. SO THERE IS SOME BALING GOING ON THOUGH TOO.

IS THERE MUCH FOR CORN ON PIVOTS IN THIS AREA?

THERE’S NOT. PROBABLY FIVE PERCENT OF THE CORN IS UNDER IRRIGATION, AND THAT ALL LOOKS REALLY GOOD. THE GDU’S WERE THERE. THERE’S GOING TO BE SOME REALLY NICE IRRIGATED CORN. BUT THE DRYLAND CORN IS, YOU KNOW, I’VE BEEN HEARING REPORTS TWO TO FIVE TON IS PROBABLY WHAT EVERYTHING IS RUNNING FOR SILAGE AND NOT A LOT OF EARS ON ANY OF IT.

NORTH OF MANDAN, NORTH DAKOTA, I’M JENNY SCHLECHT ON THE AGWEEK CORN AND SOYBEAN TOUR.

MINNESOTA’S SECOND DISTRICT REPRESENTATIVE ANGIE CRAIG IS FOCUSED ON HELPING FARMERS THROUGH THE DROUGHT, AND OTHER OBSTACLES.

AS NOAH FISH REPORTS, SHE RECENTLY VISITED AN ORGANIC DAIRY FARM, TO HEAR THEIR CONCERNS.

LET’S GET A PICTURE.

REPRESENTATIVE ANGIE CRAIG PAID A VISIT TO THE ZWEBER FAMILY FARM, TO SEE HOW THEY’RE FARMING IN THE DROUGHT. TIM ZWEBER’S FAMILY HAS FARMED IN SOUTHEAST MINNESOTA FOR MORE THAN 100 YEARS. OVER THE YEARS, THE FARM HAS EVOLVED FROM CROPS AND LIVESTOCK, TO DAIRY, TO AN ORGANIC LIVESTOCK OPERATION TODAY.

Tim Zweber: AND NOW WE’VE GONE BACK TO DOING PIGS AND CHICKENS AND EGGS. WE STILL DON’T DO CROPS, WE JUST DO IT TO FEED THE CATTLE.

ZWEBER SAYS THEY DON’T WANT TO BE TOTALLY DEPENDENT ON DAIRY, AND LIKE MANY PRODUCERS, THE DROUGHT HAS BEEN HARD ON HIS OPERATION. BUT HE SAYS CONSERVATION PRACTICES ARE HELPING THEM SURVIVE IT.

Tim Zweber: THIS IS REALLY HEAVY SOIL AND IT RAINED SO MUCH THAT WE WERE DROWNING TWO, THREE YEARS AGO THAT THERE’S STILL MOISTURE DOWN THERE. I’M MORE AFRAID FOR NEXT YEAR. NEXT YEAR’S GOING TO BE THE BAD YEAR IF IT DOESN’T RAIN.

CRAIG SAYS AS A MEMBER OF THE HOUSE AG COMMITTEE, SHE’S BEEN ASKING PRODUCERS WHAT CONGRESS TO DO TO HELP THEM SURVIVE THE DROUGHT. SHE’S ALSO BEEN APPOINTED TO THE SELECT COMMITTEE ON ECONOMIC DISPARITY AND FAIRNESS IN GROWTH. THEY’RE LOOKING FOR OTHER WAYS TO HELP RURAL AMERICA.

Rep. Angie Craig: MY SPECIFIC ARES IS TO LOOK AT HOW DO WE BUILD ECONOMIC GROWTH IN RURAL COMMUNITIES?

CRAIG SAYS THEY’RE LOOKING FOR POLICY SOLUTIONS THAT WILL LEAD TO GREATER ECONOMIC GROWTH IN RURAL AMERICA. IN ELKO, MINNESOTA, THIS IS NOAH FISH FOR AGWEEK.

AHEAD ON AGWEEK TV, WE’LL MEET SOME FARMERS HONORED FOR THEIR WORK IN AG.

THE REGION RECEIVED MORE RAIN THIS LAST WEEK DISRUPTING THE REMAINING SPRING WHEAT HARVEST, WILL IT IMPACT ROW CROP HARVEST TOO?

HERE’S JOHN WITH OUR AGRI-WEATHER OUTLOOK.

THIS IS A BUSY TIME OF YEAR ON THE FARM, BUT IT’S ALSO THE PERFECT TIME TO BE THINKING ABOUT NEW GRAIN BINS AND DRYERS.

AS ROSE DUNN FOUND, ADVANCED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS OF MAYVILLE, NORTH DAKOTA CAN SAVE YOU TIME AND MONEY.

THE NELSON FAMILY RAISES CORN, SOYBEANS AND WHEAT ON ABOUT SIX THOUSAND ACRES IN EASTERN NORTH DAKOTA. THEY’RE BUSY, ESPECIALLY THIS TIME OF YEAR. SO THEY DECIDED DRYING AND STORING GRAIN ON THE FARM WOULD SAVE THEM TIME AND MONEY. THEY TURNED TO ADVANCED GRAIN HANDLING SYSTEMS OF MAYVILLE, NORTH DAKOTA FOR HELP.

Greg Nelson: WE NEEDED SOMETHING TO HELP SPEED HARVEST AND OUR BIGGEST CONCERN WAS LABOR. WE WEREN’T GETTING ENOUGH FALL LABOR AT HARVEST. THIS WAY WE CAN DO IT OURSELVES A LITTLE MORE EFFICIENTLY.

IN FACT, THE EFFICIENCY STARTS WITH THE PLANNING STAGE. OWNER CHAD KYLLO SAYS THEIR FAMILY-RUN BUSINESS TAKES CARE OF EVERY STEP.

Chad Kyllo: YOU CALL US, WE DESIGN IT, WE LAY IT OUT, WE GIVE YOU YOUR BID ON ALL THE MILLWRIGHT SIDE, GRAIN BINS, LEGS, GRAIN DRYERS AND ALL THE ELECTRICAL, SO YOU AREN’T DEALING WITH MORE THAN ONE CONTRACTOR. ONCE YOU TURN US LOOSE, THEN THE NEXT TIME THAT WE GO THROUGH A LOT OF STUFF WILL BE WHEN WE’RE GOING TO GET READY TO SHOW YOU HOW TO RUN IT.

BEING ABLE TO HAUL GRAIN TO THE ELEVATOR ON THEIR OWN SCHEDULE RATHER THAN STRAIGHT OFF THE COMBINE, WILL GIVE THE NELSONS MUCH MORE FLEXIBILITY. AND NELSON SAYS HE APPRECIATES HOW EASY IT WAS WORKING WITH ADVANCED GRAIN HANDLING.

Greg Nelson THESE GUYS ARE ALL IN ONE. THAT WAS ONE OF THE BIG DRAWS, THEY WERE THE GENERAL. THEY TOOK CARE OF THE ELECTRICAL, THEY TOOK CARE OF THE CEMENT. THEY TOOK CARE OF EVERYTHING.

KYLLO SAYS THEIR BEST PRICES ARE IN OCTOBER AND NOVEMBER, AND THEIR CREWS WORK ALL WINTER, TO GET YOUR PROJECT DONE FOR THE NEXT SEASON.

Chad Kyllo: OUR BIGGEST GOAL IS THAT WE PLAN EARLY AND WE’RE DONE EARLY, SO IT’S READY FOR HARVEST. THE BEST TIME IS WHEN YOU’RE ACTUALLY OUT USING YOUR OWN SITE DURING THE FALL, BECAUSE THAT’S WHEN YOU REMEMBER WHAT IS GOING ON AND THE CHANGES YOU WANT TO MAKE.

Greg Nelson: EVERYTHING WENT REALLY SMOOTH, THEIR CREW IS PHENOMENAL.

THE NELSONS’ SYSTEM HAS A 280-THOUSAND BUSHEL CAPACITY, BUT KYLLO SAYS THEY CAN DESIGN ANY SIZE OF SYSTEM, AND THEY CAN EASILY BE EXPANDED IN THE FUTURE. NEAR ARTHUR, NORTH DAKOTA, THIS IS ROSE DUNN FOR AGWEEK.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT ADVANCED GRAIN HANDLING AT THE NUMBER OR EMAIL ON YOUR SCREEN.

A NORTHWEST MINNESOTA FARM FAMILY RECENTLY RECEIVED A BIG HONOR.

AS EMILY BEAL REPORTS, MARK AND BRENDY JOSSUND WERE NAMED THE CLAY COUNTY FARM FAMILY OF THE YEAR AT THE 2021 FARMFEST.

Mark Jossund: WE FARM SEVERAL THOUSAND ACRES, OWNED AND RENTED. WE FARM WHEAT, SOYBEANS AND CORN.

THE JOSSUNDS ARE A COMBINATION OF TOWN AND COUNTRY. THEY FARM IN CLAY AND NORMAN COUNTIES. IN FACT, THEY FARM BOTH MARK AND HIS WIFE BRENDY’S GREAT-GRANDPARENTS’ FARMS. BUT THEY LIVE IN MOORHEAD, WHERE THEY RAISED THEIR KIDS. MARK SAYS HE ENJOYS KEEPING UP WITH THE CHANGES ON THE FARM.

Mark Jossund: I ENJOY TECHNOLOGY, IN FACT RIGHT NOW WE’RE WORKING ON THIS COMBINE TRYING TO PUT A TRIMBLE AUTO STEER IN IT, A YIELD MONITOR. CORN, SOYBEAN VARIETIES HAVE JUST GOTTEN A LOT BETTER. PRECISION AG HAS BEEN, I THINK A REAL ADVANTAGE WITH AUTO STEER, THINGS LIKE THAT.

THE JOSSUNDS’ SON BRYSON HELPS OUT WHEN HE CAN, ANOTHER SON, CARSON JOINED THE OPERATION AFTER COLLEGE. HE SAYS HE’S PROUD OF HIS FAMILY BEING HONORED FOR ALL THEIR HARD WORK ON THE FARM. AND HE’S LOOKING FORWARD TO A LIFE ON THE FAMILY FARM.

Carson Jossund: I’VE ALWAYS LIKED BEING OUT HERE, REALLY ENJOYED FARMING, AND BEING ABLE TO SPEND TIME WITH FAMILY WHILE WORKING, I ALWAYS THOUGHT THAT WAS REALLY COOL.

MARK SAYS THEY’RE TOUCHED TO BE RECOGNIZED FOR THEIR WORK.

Mark Jossund: IT WAS QUITE AN HONOR. IT WAS TOTALLY UNEXPECTED, BUT YEAH, A VERY NICE HONOR TO BE RECOGNIZED BY THEM.

AT HENDRUM, MINNESOTA, THIS IS EMILY BEAL FOR AGWEEK.

THE DAKOTAFEST WOMAN FARMER/RANCHER OF THE YEAR WAS ALSO RECOGNIZED AT THE SHOW IN MITCHELL.

SOUTH DAKOTA GOVERNOR KRISTI NOEM ANNOUNCED AUDRA SCHEEL OF ALPENA AS THE WINNER OUT OF FIVE FINALISTS. SHE IS A FULL-TIMER FARMER AND RUNS A 3RD GENERATION DIVERSIFIED LIVESTOCK AND GRAIN OPERATION. SHE SAYS THE ROLE OF WOMEN IN AGRICULTURE CONTINUES TO GROW AND EVOLVE.

Audra Scheel: Women can be a part of ag in so many different ways and truly being, just stepping up to the plate and we already wear many many hats on our farm and ranch operations.

SHE SAYS WOMEN ARE TRULY THE BACKBONE OF THE AG INDUSTRY AND SHE WAS HUMBLED TO BE HONORED FOR HER WORK.

STILL AHEAD, WE SAY GOODBYE TO JONATHAN KNUTSON, AS HE HEADS INTO RETIREMENT.

THIS WEEK WE’RE SAYING GOODBYE TO JONATHAN KNUTSON. HE’S RETIRING, AFTER A LONG CAREER IN JOURNALISM, MUCH OF IT AT AGWEEK.

JONATHAN BEGAN HIS CAREER IN THE MID-1980S, AND GREW TO BECOME ONE OF THE REGION’S MOST RESPECTED AG JOURNALISTS.

HE CAME BY HIS LOVE OF AG NATURALLY, GROWING UP ON A FARM NEAR MCVILLE, NORTH DAKOTA.

WE ASKED HIM WHAT STORIES HE’S MOST PROUD OF. THEY INCLUDE

THE LONG, SLOW RISE OF DEVILS LAKE, AND HOW IT AFFECTED FARMERS IN THAT AREA.u0009

PLUS AWARD-WINNING STORIES ON THE CONTROVERSY OVER CULTURED MEAT AND DISASTROUS FLOODING AROUND TOWNER, NORTH DAKOTA.

JONATHAN WILL CONTINUE TO WRITE HIS “PLAIN LIVING” COLUMN FOR AGWEEK MAGAZINE.

THANKS FOR WATCHING THIS WEEK’S EDITION OF AG WEEK TV.

REMEMBER, FOR ALL YOUR AG NEWS, GO TO AG WEEK.COM, OR FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK, TWITTER AND INSTAGRAM AS WELL. HAVE YOURSELF A GREAT AND SAFE WEEK.



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